Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Courtney Ransom with "Thor", featured on MSU's "Our People"



Courtney Ransom, one of our DVM students, is featured in "Our People", posing with her favorite calf, "Thor".  Read her story here.

Monday, November 5, 2018

CVM Wins Dog Bowl Trophy


For the third year in a row, Mississippi State CVM brought home the Dog Bowl thanks to our win against Texas A&M! The Dog Bowl was established in 2013 by former Head Coach Jackie Sherrill. Athletic Director John Cohen presented Dr. Hoblet and Dr. McLaughlin with the trophy before the Louisiana Tech game.  Read more about the Dog Bowl.  Click here

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

MSU to lead new USAID Feed the Future Innovation Lab on Fish

Dr. Mark Lawrence
STARKVILLE, Miss.—Mississippi State University will lead a new $15 million U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) initiative that continues efforts to reduce poverty and improve health outcomes for global populations dependent on aquaculture-led economies.
USAID funding over five years will create the Feed the Future Innovation Lab on Fish, which MSU will lead through the university’s Global Center for Aquatic Food Security under the direction of Mark Lawrence, associate dean and professor in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine.
MSU President Mark E. Keenum called the new USAID partnership “groundbreaking” and said the university is “well-positioned to lead this important effort.”
“Our relationship with USAID is a long and fruitful one that underscores Mississippi State’s position as a leading agricultural research university,” said Keenum. “It also speaks specifically to the quality of research and scholarship in our College of Veterinary Medicine.”
Read More... 


Dr. Hossam Abdelhamed monitors and feeds catfish fingerlings at the Mississippi State,
College of Veterinary Medicine fish lab.

Friday, August 10, 2018

MSU-CVM Staff Member Takes Unique Path to Completing PhD


Edward (Eddie) Meek has taken a unique path to obtaining his PhD in Environmental Toxicology, maneuvering a somewhat unconventional route to complete his studies. It has been a long but rewarding journey for Meek, who works full-time as a Laboratory Manager for Center for Environmental Health Sciences at Mississippi State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (MSU-CVM).

After completing his undergraduate degree from Mississippi State University in 1999, Meek went on to pursuing his master’s degree at MSU-CVM.

“At the time, I was looking at four other opportunities and had intentions of leaving Starkville with a job lined up at a federal laboratory,” Meek said.

Funding fell through for that federal position at the last minute, and Meek found himself coming back to MSU, where there were a few research associate positions available. While interviewing for one of the positions, Dr. Janice Chambers, William L. Giles Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, had a position open up for a research associate. She suggested Meek apply for that position and he did. After being offered the job, Meek decided to take it.


“I took the position with Dr. Chambers not knowing what career opportunities would lie ahead,” Meek said. “It was an opportunity to increase my laboratory techniques, while still being in the toxicology research field.”
After a few years of working in the position, Chambers encouraged him to start taking classes again, so Meek applied to a PhD program. Around the same time, Chambers determined that she needed to hire a laboratory manager. Meek applied for the position, was offered it, and worked the position while continuing to take classes and complete research for his PhD on his own time.

“I had to manage my time well and work diligently toward my goal, because I was working a full-time job and taking classes,” Meek said. “It fluctuated over time on how much opportunity I had to work on it, and it was a slow and arduous process.”

While it took him nearly six years to complete his degree, Meek is now finished with his studies. His dissertation was accepted and will officially have a PhD in Environmental Toxicology as of August 2018.

“It’s not the typical track that most people take, but the opportunity was there, and so I have gotten my BS, MS, and PhD all from Mississippi State University,” Meek said. “I love this university and have dedicated my career here. It was nice to be able to continue my education while still working.”

After graduation, Meek intends to stay on in his current position, Laboratory Manager for the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, where he works with neuro-toxicology.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Animals in Focus Visit


The Starkville, Miss. First United Methodist Church welcomed MSU-CVM’s Animals in Focus group to teach and show kids in their summer childcare program about special techniques in dealing with animals and with themselves. The kids started their day by learning some fun and interesting facts about mans best friend. Each animal was able to demonstrate a specific task that correlated with the kids own health lifestyles. The kids were first introduced to Halo, a five-year-old border collie and veterinary technician Megan Doolittle, as they performed an opening act. After introductions, the kids were split into groups and led through five different stations. Each rotation lasted 20 minutes and each station had a specific purpose in teaching the kids about health and exercise

Station one introduced how to approach a dog appropriately and tools to do this. Each child was able to participate as the leaders of this station demonstrated. First ask, then pet gently. The kids loved petting and playing with the dogs and even got to see the dogs perform tricks. One such trick was Wrigley (the dog) jumping over the kids as they were hunched on the floor. Each one wanted their turn and had Wrigley jumping all over the place. This station taught the children how to approach an animal and reminded them to ask permission from the owner before petting. The kids practiced holding out their hands to let the dogs sniff them before reaching out and petting them. They were taught how to read a dog’s body language to gauge the temperament of the pet before reaching out to touch them.


After meet and greets, the kids were led through to station two. This station consisted of teaching on the topic of dental hygiene. It taught the kids the importance of brushing one’s teeth everyday. They learned that just as they have to brush their teeth everyday, so should their dogs. It is important to keep your pet’s teeth healthy just like your own. If you don’t have the tools to do this, the kids were reminded that their local veterinarian they can do it for them.


Station three was all about comparative anatomy between a humane bone and an animal bone. Each child was shown the differences between the two and how each are fragile in their own way, but similar as well. The kids were shown how dogs have more teeth than humans and how their bones are much denser than our own.  


The fourth station was all about healthy lifestyles through exercise and how doing this everyday helps one to keep up their health. This station saw Halo perform various activities with the kids including pushups, races, and jumping up and down. Halo also showed the kids how one correctly crosses the road safely, by looking both ways, before going forward. This station stressed the importance of a healthy lifestyle and how keeping that up positively affects one’s life.


The fifth and final station showed the kids how to make some healthy snacks that are good for on the go. The kids were taught about healthy eating habits for both animals and humans and were shown the difference between a healthy snack and an unhealthy snack. The kids even got to make their own bag of trail mix.


While having a good time and playing around, Animals in Focus informed kids not just about animal health, but their own health and safety as well. The kids were very attentive and had a passport-type book to bring along with them during the events. Each time they learned something new, they got a special stamp in their book. This morning was all about learning and understanding health and exercise through their animals. Just like us, animals need exercise and healthy food options.


To learn more about our Animals in Focus program, visit their website here: http://cvm.msstate.edu/animal-health-center/companion-animals/shelter-medicine/animals-in-focus

Friday, July 20, 2018

MSU-CVM Animal Health Center Employee Provides Quilts to Children in Need

Brenda Cunningham
Brenda Cunningham has been working at the MSU-CVM since 2011, and getting to know people and watching their animals get better is her favorite thing about the job. But she has a special skill – a creative outlet of sorts – that many might know about her.
Before coming to work at MSU-CVM, Cunningham was a nanny to twin girls, one of whom had cerebral palsy. She noted that because of this, their bond was strong and she stayed with them much of the time. Ultimately, her sewing background made it possible to give something back to the girls.
“I have sewed my entire life, so I constantly wanted to make things for the girls,” Cunningham said.
One day, they were in a fabric store getting materials to make some outfits and the girls found a piece of fleece that they liked. They loved it, hung on to it and talked about that the whole time that they were in the store. Cunningham agreed to buy them each a piece and make them both a quilt. It became their car blanket and they used the blankets for a long time. Cunningham said seeing them cherish these blankets for so long is what got her started on this journey.
“I started this to give children something for the car, for safety and for just feeling comfortable about themselves and having something they really own.”
Even after the girls grew up, Cunningham still loved making these things. She tried selling them, but didn’t find much of a market for it. Finding that out though is exactly what led her to start donating them. Cunningham started by taking some to the hospital in Tupelo and then donating them locally to Oktibbeha County Hospital.
“I just wanted an outlet where I could keep making them and giving them away,” Cunningham said. “That’s when I learned of the Safe Haven for Pets program here at the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine, and so I’ve been collecting things for them ever since.”
Safe Haven for Pets is an organization through the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine that provides temporary care to the animals of domestic violence victims. Safe Haven partners with Care Lodge Domestic Violence Shelter in Meridian, Miss. to provide temporary shelter and medical care to the pets of individuals fleeing domestic violence situations. The program also does fundraisers throughout the year to provide much-needed supplies for the individuals served by Care Lodge.
“I’ve been making quilts and giving them away for about four or five years now and I just feel honored that I can do something to help someone else,” Cunningham said. “Children are our most vulnerable and it breaks my heart to know that they are in trouble or that they are sad.”
So Cunningham started making the quilts to donate to Care Lodge via the Safe Haven for Pets program a few Christmases ago. She received such good feedback from them and was told that the kids loved them. She said that’s all the confirmation she needed to hear, and so she kept making them.
“You know it is fun for me and gives me a creative outlet for myself,” Cunningham said. “I wanted the kids to keep them, something they didn’t have to borrow while they were there at the shelter.”
Cunningham said each quilt she makes is unique. It all depends on what fabric she has available and what she feels like making at the time. Some will have patches or lace on them, while others will have embroidery. She feels that making these quilts provides the children with something that they can have that will be their own. She wants each child that receives a quilt to feel that someone cared enough for them to give them something new that they can keep as their very own.
“Making a quilt and knowing that it’s going to a kid that can snuggle up in it and feel protected or feel like they are going to be okay makes me feel good and proud that I can do something small to help them,” Cunningham said.

More information about MSU’s Safe Haven for Pets program can be found on their Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/msucvmsafehavenforpets/.

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Day 3 Equine Lab

By Allie Allsup

This morning, the campers got the chance to experience Equine lab. Equine, is all about horses, so the morning was full of learning all about these beautiful creatures. The campers were split into three groups and taken to three different rooms to observe and participate in an eye exam, an ultrasound and the viewing of Nick’s (the ‘painted’ horse) anatomy, both skeleton and internal organs.

In exam room #1 was Dr. Brashier who was giving an eye exam on Tigger. Similar to when a human gets an eye exam, Dr. Brashier dilated the eyes so as to get a better view of all of the ocular structures, more importantly the fundus. Unlike a human though, Tigger had to be lightly sedated in order for a thorough ocular exam to be performed. If you don’t know, a horse’s head weighs around one hundred pounds, so the doctor has to be extra careful when treating the patient. As he got started, Dr. Brashier instructed the kids on basic eye anatomy and the turned off the lights to get a better view of the pupil. He taught the campers a little bit about what happens when light touches the eye and what to expect from it when it did. Before light touches a horses eye it is round, but once light shines on it, the pupil turns horizontal. Next, the campers learned about the tapetum, which is a light reflective tissue in the eye. The tapetum has two basic parts, the upper two-thirds of the eye is a greenish reflective color and the bottom is one-third blue grey. Dr. Brashier instructed the campers on how to hold a light probe in order to see the fundus for themselves. Each camper got to hold the lens up to the horse’s eye, and using a transluminator, they were able to also see the horse’s optic disc.

In exam room #2 was Dr. Crabtree and the mare, Blackfoot. Here, the campers were shown, through ultrasound, Blackfoot’s internal organs. They were able to see the lungs, kidneys and the spleen to start. Each camper got to grab the probe and place it just in front of the last rib in order to see both the spleen and left kidney. Dr. Crabtree says this is what every first year doctor is taught when getting into the program, so getting this hands on experience and knowledge is very beneficial to the teens and gives them each a head start in their future studies. Hopefully if they stay the route, the campers will be ahead of the game and be able to point out exactly where to place the probe to find each of these internal organs.  

After the ultrasound, it was time to move on to Nick the horse and Dr. Light. Nick, who is a white horse, was painted head to toe on both sides. One side was his full skeletal image and the other side was his internal organs. Dr. Light was able to point out and discuss what each part of the body did and how the strong 

For more photos and daily posts follow https://www.facebook.com/MSUVetCamp/